Chewy Lemon Cookies (whole wheat & butterless)

One of the many things I love about our new house is that it came with a lemon tree! I grew up with a lemon tree in our backyard, and it is just so convenient to run out and grab a lemon when you need one! But honestly, when we bought the house, my mom and I were hoping it was a lime tree (the fruit wasn’t ripe yet so we weren’t sure) so we could swap citrus ;)

Anyways, I LOVE lemon flavored anything and I have been working on a healthier lemon cookie recipe to share with you guys. This isn’t raw kale folks, so I’m not telling you to eat the entire batch in one sitting either.

chewy whole wheat lemon cookies

This recipe is made with whole wheat flour and is butterless! I also got to experiment with Nektar Honey Crystals (I bought mine from Whole Foods)! Nektar Honey Crystals are 100% all natural granulated honey- basically honey in a convenient packet that doesn’t make a sticky mess or harden in a bottle. It made this recipe super easy to just open a couple packets and add my honey!

nektar naturals honey crystals

1 packet = 1 teaspoon liquid honey

A printable version of this recipe is at the bottom of the page

Ingredients

Cookies

  • 2 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 1/3 cup olive oil (light is preferred)
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 tsp pure almond extract
  • 2 packets Nektar Honey Crystals (equal to 2 tsp liquid honey)
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice

Glaze

  • 1 tbsp lemon zest
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1.5 cups powder sugar

Directions

Preheat oven to 350°F.

In a medium bowl, sift flour, baking soda, and salt together. Mix to combine. Set aside.

dry ingredients whole wheat flour baking

In a large bowl, beat brown sugar, olive oil, egg, almond extract, Nektar Honey Crystals, lemon zest, and lemon juice until thoroughly combined.

With the mixer on low, slowly add 1/3 of the dry mixture to the wet mixture. Mix just until combined. Repeat this process, adding 1/3 of the dry mixture at a time, until everything is combined. It will look moist but crumbly (see photo below).

chewy whole wheat lemon cookies

On a non-stick surface (I have used a Silpat, parchment paper, and even plastic wrap will work), carefully dump dough into a pile. Mold it into a tight ball (it should no longer look crumbly).

chewy whole wheat lemon cookies

Place a Silpat or a piece of parchment paper on a baking sheet. Break off small balls of dough from your large ball (it might be a little crumbly, but just press the dough firmly in your hands until it combines). Mold the small balls into disks, about 1.5 inches in diameter and about 1/4 inch thick (see below).

chewy whole wheat lemon cookies

Bake for ~8 minutes. They will crack a little bit on the edges and look dryer, but I promise they will be chewy :)

chewy whole wheat lemon cookies

Once they are cool enough to handle, place cookies on a wire rack and cool completely.

Place a piece of wax paper under your wire rack (This is just to catch the glaze and make clean-up easier). Mix all the glaze ingredients together with a fork or whisk. Drizzle over the cooled cookies.

chewy whole wheat lemon cookies

Let the glaze harden. And voila!

chewy whole wheat lemon cookies

Chewy Lemon Cookies (Whole Wheat & Butterless)

  • Servings: ~20 cookies
  • Difficulty: easy/medium
  • Print

Ingredients

Cookieschewy whole wheat lemon cookies

  • 2 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 1/3 cup olive oil (light is preferred)
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 tsp pure almond extract
  • 2 packets Nektar Honey Crystals (equal to 2 tsp liquid honey)
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice

Glaze

  • 1 tbsp lemon zest
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1.5 cups powder sugar

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. In a medium bowl, sift flour, baking soda, and salt together. Mix to combine. Set aside.
  3. In a large bowl, beat brown sugar, olive oil, egg, almond extract, Nektar Honey Crystals, lemon zest, and lemon juice until thoroughly combined.
  4. With the mixer on low, slowly add 1/3 of the dry mixture to the wet mixture. Mix just until combined. Repeat this process, adding 1/3 of the dry mixture at a time, until everything is combined. It will look moist but crumbly.
  5. On a non-stick surface (I have used a Silpat, parchment paper, and even plastic wrap will work), carefully dump dough into a pile. Mold it into a tight ball (it should no longer look crumbly).
  6. Place a Silpat or a piece of parchment paper on a baking sheet. Break off small balls of dough from your large ball (it might be a little crumbly, but just press the dough firmly in your hands until it combines). Mold the small balls into disks, about 1.5 inches in diameter and about 1/4 inch thick.
  7. Bake for ~8 minutes. They will crack a little bit on the edges and look dryer, but I promise they will be chewy!
  8. Once they are cool enough to handle, place cookies on a wire rack and cool completely.
  9. Place a piece of wax paper under your wire rack (This is just to catch the glaze and make clean-up easier). Mix all the glaze ingredients together with a fork or whisk. Drizzle over the cooled cookies.
  10. Let the glaze harden. And enjoy!

fitnessmeetsfrosting.com

This post was sponsored by Nektar Naturals. All opinions are my own.

Changing Up the Running

Monday WORKOUT: Barre workout (focusing on balance/single-leg exercises)

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OMG 2 posts in a row?! I know you’re shocked ;)

As most of you know, my IT band was hurting on one leg, usually during long runs. I finally decided to stop being stubborn and to change up my running.

This means that I am basically starting near the beginning of my typical half marathon training cycles= shorter short runs and shorter long runs. Here’s what my typical week looks like now:

  • MONDAY: Strength training (I take a workout class during lunch at work. It’s varies each week, but basically HIIT + core work. It’s awesome).
  • TUESDAY: Easy short run (3-5 mile runch with girlfriends)
  • WEDNESDAY: Off
  • THURSDAY: Short run (usually with speedwork- runch with girlfriends)
  • FRIDAY: Off
  • SATURDAY: Short run, cross train, or strength train
  • SUNDAY: Long run (usually ≥7 miles. Depends how I’m feeling. Maybe some speedwork thrown in.)

So far I’m loving this “plan.” It’s not set in stone, so I move things around according to my schedule. See- 2 Friday’s ago I just felt like running instead of resting

run

And then this past Saturday, my little cousins’ had a basketball game near our house (BTW they made it to the playoffs!). I decided to run there to watch! Additionally, my current plan is to (hopefully) swap Saturdays’ current workout to yoga at CorePower Yoga! More on that later :)

garmin run

My goal right now is to just build a strong base before I start officially training for another half marathon. I don’t have a race planned until the summer, and this makes running wayyyy less stressful. Remember, running is for fun! Unless you’re Kyle…

berkeley half marathon

This was after my Berkeley Half Marathon a couple years ago when I angered my bulged disc during the race but kept running.

I’m also looking in to getting different running shoes. I was in LOVE with my Mizuno Wave Inspire 9’s, hated the 10’s, and currently tolerate the 11’s. I’m a severe over-pronater so I really need that support but have yet to find something else.

In the meantime, I’ll try to keep you updated on training! Right now is slow and steady- my turtle plan. Oh and just FYI I post on Instagram much more regularly than here (if you care ;) )

And this has nothing to do with running (I guess fuel for running?) but I had the most amazing tabbouleh last night! My grandma’s caregiver made some Lebanese food and sent some home with us. So. Good.

tabbouleh

Do you like tabbouleh?

How do you come back after injuries?

Does your significant other like to run?

What is your favorite running shoe? If you’re an over-pronater, what shoe do you recommend?

Kaiser SF Half Marathon 2015

Remember how I was having IT band issues? If you don’t, it’s cause I’m a horrible blogger and never post anymore #guiltyface

A few weekends ago, I ran the Kaiser SF Half Marathon with Kyle’s mom (L) and his aunt (R)! Technically I didn’t run with them- this was Kyle’s aunt’s first half (!!!) and they wanted to walk it. Kyle’s aunt had tons of fun and verbally committed to another half marathon. Verbal contracts are binding in some states, and we’re going to pretend that it is true in California too.

kaiser sf half marathon

We all met up at Kyle’s parents’ house on race day (which also happened to be Super Bowl Sunday = epic post-race eating) and drove to the city. We cut it kind of close, forgetting how much time it would take to park and line up for pre-race peeing.

Before I knew it, the race started. We took off and I knew this would be a hard one. My legs already felt heavy around mile 2. I was getting grumpy because this race doesn’t have assigned starting waves. People line up near minute/mile signs and it’s based on the honor system. And let’s face it, the world is full of lying SOBs. Weaving. Lots of weaving.

Then my IT band started hurting (not as severe as usual because I had my Rock Tape on) around mile 3 and I knew this was going to be a long race.

Miles 1-6: 8:57, 8:49, 9:21, 9:15, 9:31, 8:45

I tried to focus on the amazing scenery (you run through Golden Gate Park) and have fun! I kind of got in the “I’m-spacing-out-zone” which helped with the pain, and before I knew it, I was running along the Great Highway (we were running on the street portion).

Miles 7-10: 8:59, 9:05, 9:12, 9:11

Running along the Great Highway is really pretty, but then it starts to mentally toy with you. A few miles down the Great Highway is where you turn around and head back toward the finish line- which means you see all those fast, leggy, athletes in runder wear running past you on the other side of the road. All you think about is, “When do I get to turn around????” and “I want her legs!”

As I was getting frustrated with IT band pain and being a grumpy gills cause all those gazelle-like creatures on the other side were seemingly gliding along the road, I remembered how much this portion of the race during last year’s Kaiser SF Half Marathon SUCKED (It was cold, raining, and I had tossed my gloves to Kyle early on and I could no longer feel my fingers). I realized I should be thankful for good weather and then decided to finally look at my watch (I was trying to ignore it because I knew this race would not be a PR with leg issues + lack of serious training).

I tried to do that hard math called “addition” and “division” and I realized I might be able to finish in under 2 hours (my watch didn’t start on time so I knew my watch time was off). Finally that series of college calculus classes were paying off ;)

I tried my best to pick up the pace and ignore that damn IT band pain.

Miles 11-13: 9:16, 8:57, 8:44

Official Time: 2:00:34

Balls. So close. Even though I was super close to finishing under 2 hours, I didn’t feel bad about this one. I knew at the end that I had given it my all. There was no way my bad leg was going to let me run faster that day. Another half marathon down!

kaiser sf half marathon

How do you power through a bad race?

Do you like out-and-back races or point to point?